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Tahoe

Chevrolet Tahoe - A full-size 3-row SUV

After six years in production, GM decided to give the Tahoe an overhaul in the form of a brand-new, fifth-generation model. Chevrolet’s full-size SUV is more modern and innovative than ever before, but it’s still one of the few truck-based 4x4s left around (body-on-frame chassis). Given how popular the fourth-gen Tahoe was, the new car has a lot to live up to, but GM has gone to great lengths to make it as luxurious as it is off-road capable.

Visually, the new Tahoe is a lot more aggressive and interesting to look at than its predecessor. It’s riddled with sharp edges and curvy lines, all of which only further accentuate Chevrolet’s current design language.  But If you think the exterior is ace, wait until you see the cabin. Full of premium materials and the latest technology on offer, it’s an extremely nice place to spend time in. Just like the previous Tahoe, the latest one offers an ample amount of legroom and headroom for all passengers, but it’s now so luxurious I’d say it’s on par with most of its German competitors.

 

Because Chevy has given it a longer wheelbase compared to the outgoing model, it’s got even more space inside for occupants and luggage. The second row gets 3 extra inches of space while third-row occupants get a whopping 10 inches. Maximum cargo space shot up from 94.7 cubic feet to 122.9 cubic feet as well.

The engines are largely a carryover from last year, so you can have it with the standard 5.3-liter V8 or the optional 6.2-liter V8. If you want something more economical but just as torquey, there’s also a brand-new 3.0-liter straight-six diesel on offer. All three engines get mated to GM’s excellent 10-speed auto transmission. The shifts are ridiculously smooth and fluid, especially with the diesel since it produces so much torque low-down.

For the first time ever the Tahoe gets a fully independent rear suspension. I would say that completely transforms the way it drives, but that would be the understatement of the century. Ditching the old solid-axle rear suspension setup was the best thing GM could have done for the Tahoe. It’s now incredibly smooth and compliant on the road, completely soaking up bumps and road imperfections.

Anyone thinking this means the new Tahoe is now worse off-road shouldn’t worry. Because it still uses a proper ladder chassis instead of a monocoque, it’s every bit as capable as the last Tahoe. The added benefit of course is that it’s now a lot more compliant on the road, a little bit more practical, more efficient, and better looking than its predecessor. As far as new reveals go, I’d say Chevy knocked it out of the park with the Tahoe. Anyone looking to buy a full-size SUV should go test drive one as soon as possible. Prices start from just $61,398 for the base LS trim level .